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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 233 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 1:00pm EDT
of grievances that the united states had against great britain in the early 19th century. many are associated with maritime disputes between great britain and the united states because this is the middle of that -- napolian wars. they are trying to establish trade, and they are impressing seamen from american vessels because they need to script crews to keep the royal navy manned because they were disputing with the british and the indians on the frontier, and british policy affected the prizes very badly, and prizes for american exports slumped during this period causing an agricultural depression making people angry. there's a whole range of those sort of grievances. basically, i think why the war was ultimately fought and why it was fought when it was because many of the disputes have been preceded in 1812 by a number of years without necessarily producing the declaration of war was that by the summer of 1811, the main grievance was something called the council, a british form of executive order, the american equivalent is the executive order issued by the president, and through the execut
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 10:30am EDT
to place it in a larger perspective, and that is by non-indians who want equality in the united states, wrapping themselves in the flag, and native peoples were here first, and survival, the fact that they have survived as separate cultures uniquely on the planet as american indians is, to me, the most noteworthy. they have not melded into the mainstream. by and large, tribes are still operating. some are in better shape than others, some are larger, some are smaller. some have suffered more, some have suffered slightly less, but they are still here, and if i wanted to change one thing, i would like the mainstream of america to realize that american indians, as tribes and tribal people, are still here, still a vibrant part of the economy, a part of the culture, a part of the arts, literature, music, this is, after all, oklahoma is, after all, an american indian state at its start, and american indians have not disappeared or vanished into the mainstream with dinosaurs, as some people are prone to ask me sometimes. >>> find out where skrchlt span's local content vehicles are going next
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 9:00am EDT
in history the united states needs latin america more than latin america needs the united states? now comcast your mind back -- cast your mind back to a decade ago, that question would seem absurd. the united states was the undisputed heavyweight champion of the world, the most powerful country economically, politically, militarily. why on earth would he need anyone, let alone a continent known for its economic crises, its political instability for having almost no global clout? well, how times have changed. and how used we have become to the fact of change. there's an old jewish joke i heard probably about 5000 times when i was growing up, and it's set in eastern europe in the 19 century in a period when borders were changing very rapidly. and the story goes that a woman is taking up washington in a remote area and the soldier rides up and he declares old woman, from this day forth, this man -- this land is no longer politically his imperial russian. she watches him go. thank god, i couldn't stand another polish winter. [laughter] thank you for laughing. i will pass those laughs on to my fat
CSPAN
May 19, 2012 8:00pm EDT
's also something going on in the united states but in the united states that process takes on a much different context, and the main reason for that is that in the u.s. you have universal white male suffrage by 1820 unlike in europe where it is france and the 1870s and other countries later on, in the u.s. you have basically full mass democracy very early on and you have it before most immigrants he show up, so when the immigrants begin to be integrated into american society and particularly when they begin to be integrated into american politics, they're being integrated into a much different world than are those immigrants that we talked about in europe. so what i want to do today is talk about how the united states begins to develop a plurist philosophy, a pleuralist vision and i want to trace the roots back to the way politics worked in 19th century america. i have here just to give you a sense of the kind of politics we're talking about, an image from harper's weekly in 1858, around election time or just after election time, in 1858 and shows a saloon and a polling place. they d
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 12:00am EDT
connolly looks at pluralism in the united states. this 1:15 class took place at ball state university in indiana. >>> on tuesday in class, we looked at the social question in europe. and one of the things we talk about was the ways in which european governments attempted to appease the working classes, alleviate their concerns, reduce social tension. one of the tools they used was mass politics, as we talked about. that's also something that's going on in the united states. but in the united states, that process takes on a much different context. the main reason for that is that in the u.s., you have universal white male suffrage by 1820. unlike in europe where it is france and the 1870s and other countries later on, in the u.s. you have basically full mass democracy very early on and you have it before most immigrants show up, so when the immigrants begin to be integrated into american society and particularly when they begin to be integrated into american politics, they're being integrated into a much different world than are those immigrants that we talked about in europe. so what
WHUT
May 20, 2012 8:30am EDT
quote vision. >> we know this is a very tough financial time for europe and for the united states, but we believe those leaders can still maintain those commitments and even increase them even in tough economic times and it's the right thing to do, it's the moral thing to do. on friday, prior to leaving for camp david, president obama
CBS
May 20, 2012 5:00am PDT
and the northwestern united states. >>> you've been here for four years and you're about to enter tour of duty. and what is the israel center. greatcoat the department of the center cisco federation. established about 15 or 16 years ago to be a bridge between israel and the bay area's jewish committee. >>> both of you've been in the jewish committee in the bay area for a good amount of time. i'm wondering what are some of your observations about how the bay area understands the state to visit israel and that is really a culture >>> i found i divided into a couple of things but first the jewish committee here in the bay area is a large and fibrinogen very deeply connected to israel. and we feel great kinship israel is the unusual nation state of the world people. the jewish committee instinctively understands that since the connection between us is very strong and here in the bay area have felt very good in the last four years the political support for israel among elected officials as a very strong it's great understanding and french than the economic connection to in silicon valley and the
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 1:00pm EDT
century a pluralist philosophy and explanation of what the united states was like. now, basically just there is a lot of different ways to define and understand pluralism and so just for our purposes of fairly straight forward and basic definition of it is a vision of in this case the united states as a country with many different cultures, many different ethnic groups and there isn't one single american identity that everyone has to subscribe to in every way. another way to think about it is the way in which immigrants could identify themselves. they could identify themselves in hyphenated terms as irish american, polish american and italian american and what i want to do today is get at the roots of that identity, the roots of the development of that conception of what the united states is. we're to do it by going through three different sections, three different sets of developments. the first is going to be the world of party politics like the image we just looked at from the period from about 1840 to the end of the 19th century. it is a period when there is very stiff competition
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 10:00am EDT
the united states government was drafting the moral act and the homestead act of 1862 if they ever thought about the possibility of counter fit operations being established in the midwest and northern great plains.counterfit operati established in the midwest and northern great plains. and if so what were their plans in preventing such an event. >> i found no record of that being a concern it for tfor they department, which particularly in 1862 was, if you read samson chase's, the secretary treasury's diary, it becomes clear that he was running an endless effort simply to fund the next day's operations. or argue bring the past weably operations. day after day he comes in to his office to find million of dollars of unpaid bills on his desk and he'll complain about the fact that he has no idea how to pay them. and if they had been paid in cou counterfeit money, i think that would have been fine with him. most of the republican party was strongly opposed to the idea of fiat money, greenback money, to begin with. chase and lincoln were really driven to the wall by the fact that they had no alt
WETA
May 20, 2012 9:30am EDT
of united states becoming majority-minority company. >> we best make haste because the new majority is the least well educated to compete our country in the global economy. >> with low birth rate and 10,000 baby boomers entering medicare every day, this will help fill that fiscal gap that we have of taxpayer government funded programs. >> i'm going to echo what the congresswoman said, education is the most important issue, these communities have higher barriers for both higher education, k-12 education furlong time we've said that is a hispanic issue, black issue, now all of our issue. how we educate those students is how the country will change in the next hundred years. >> i think we have immigrants paying info a system that they're not necessarily eligible for. and in addition we have increasing number of nontraditional families who deserve ownership over their retirement assets. >> entitlement reforms? you're saying that -- >> social security reform. medicare. >> there are people who are paying phone a system that they're not eligible to get money back out. that is not proper. i
CSPAN
May 19, 2012 10:30pm EDT
of a yet-determined united states. the fact that not just slaves were free but that the slaves remained here had incredible consequences for the country. we can talk about the obvious good when we think about the freedom struggles of various different groups. when we think about the current marriage equality, it dates back to the civil rights movement which itself dates back to the civil war. one of the most stunning things i came across in my very recent study was when you start studying the women's rights movements and you see how many of those folks started out as abolitionists. when you hear sarah gremky saying by looking into the rights of slaves, i gained deeper insights into my own rights as a woman. that's a mangled quote but basically the essence of what she said. it is impossible for me to picture america as it is today without picturing african-americans as a political force, without picturing african-americans as a cultural force. where would we be without jazz? what is america without jazz, without its popular music? when you think about these questions that our president i
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 12:30am EDT
for a free irish republic meshes with the idea that the united states is a republic so it is very easy for irish people at least to imagine themselves as being good, loyal irish men and women and being good americans, the two identities are merging, coming together. >> would the americans have seen them pushing for a republic as proof that like not the civil rising mission but that they had improved the irish? >> there is some who -- yeah, the idea that them advocating for irish republic would be evidence of the irish moving up the ladder a little bit socially and civically and i think there is some of that and certainly people who argue a little later on that the irish progressed enough they can be considered legitimate american citizens. it is the other newcomers that arrived more recently that we have worry about, the new italians and eastern european jews and so forth and there is a little bit of that and this is an irish authored image that's being created here. irish sort of answering that charge that they're not good citizens, and so they do make the claim supporting a republic
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 11:00am EDT
is one of the most sought after speakers on this subject in the united states and his lectures are online or in many different places electronically if you want to look for them. stephanie mccurry, between andy and gary, taught for some years at san diego state and at northwestern and has been at the university of pennsylvania now at professor of history for eight, nine, maybe ten years by now. she was born in belfast. her family immigrated to canada. she went to high school in canada and came to the u.s. to graduate school. she did her ph.d. at suny binghamton. she is one of the most imaginative historians we have on matters of gender, race, class, among other things, about southern history and about american history. she -- her first book called masters of small world's about yoman households was a multiple prize-winning book and still rests on almost everybody's "ma yoman households was a multiple prize-winning book and still rests on almost everybody's s a yoman households was a multiple prize-winning book and still rests on almost everybody' abou yoman households was a multiple prize
CBS
May 20, 2012 12:00pm EDT
's in office because of a feeling that the united states abused his victory in the cold war, we moved nato in his face. we bombed serbia, we had a bunch every american advisors go there and help the -- john, russia is a natural ally of the united states and my judgment for this reason -- we have two potential adversaries coming, one is islamic world and the other is china. russia is as i say a natural ally because they have the same adversaries and i agree with obama, should you make an effort really to befriend or treat these people as equals and don't treat them the way we've ia the end of the cold war. >> putin issued apache to his ministers telling them to pursue amicable relations with the u.s. the contrast between the campaign rhetoric and the official marching orders could not be greater. >> good reason for both. when you -- there's a lot of hostility to the united states within the russian community. the russian people. and so if you're campaigning future re-election, which putin was, you certainly want to exploit that. now that he's governing, it becomes a very different game. an
CBS
May 19, 2012 5:30pm PDT
of the train's letter he think the american government and others for efforts to bring him to the united states. >>> after turbulence i have come here thanks to the assistance of friends >>> the chinese activist left a beijing hospital saturday and boarded a united airlines flight with wife and two sons. the white house says the state department worked with chinese authorities to get him a visa. >>> we welcome this development and he can pursue a course of study in the u.s. >>> his flight to the united states ends a diplomatic tug-of- war that lasted a month before he left he told reporters he was worried chinese authorities would try to retaliate against his extended family still in china. the blind activist an outspoken critic of china's forced abortion policy is. he escaped house arrest last month and sought refuge at the american embassy. he was able to go to a local hospital to each seek treatment and reunited with his family he then asked to leave china and hillary clinton were to get him out of the country, he said after he's done with law school he would like to go home but not clear if
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 12:45am EDT
that refused to fight in the united states for example eugene debs rose to give a tour against american participation in the war and was sent to prison and was still in prison in november 1920 when he received nearly a million votes for president on the socialist ticket. another america the pioneer social worker jane addams also was a strong opponent of the war for more than 500 americans were jailed as conscientious objectors including these two at fort riley arkansas. in germany the great radical spoke out against the war and britain the meeting philosopher was most elegant of the war a hero for me writing this book. i will review one thing if you want describing the feeling he rode and i appreciate him because of this intellectual bravery and acknowledging the conflict in his feelings which is something that often most of us don't do when we take a political stand. they describe themselves as being tortured by patriotism as ardently as any retired colonel. love of them was the strongest the motion i possessed and in a period setting aside such a moment making it difficult as truth, t
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 1:25pm EDT
or literary figures from the rest of the world, as you know. united states of america, the land i love and have adopted as my home, in recent decades has paid less and less attention. especially to literary translation. in the last 32 years come in the number of books translated, there has been a lot more translation of english literature in several countries than there has been in america. >> host: is there a contemporary writer in iran that you would recommend for people? >> guest: absolutely. let me first say that in spite of the islamic, or perhaps because of it, the lechery regime is going down in iran. and women are in center stage. i can give you one example about women. in 1947, we have the first major collection of short stories. there is a novelist but unfortunately passed away a couple of weeks ago. at the age of 90. women poets in iran go back several thousand years. poetry is more of a woman's thinking, act come and form. you don't need to go to a studio, you don't need directors, you don't need a cruel. it is a women's art. in 1947, it is the fifth major literary [inaudib
CSPAN
May 19, 2012 8:30pm EDT
a good republican citizen in the united states. other questions? does this make sense? we talked about on tuesday this idea of invented traditions and that's what's going on here. this is the st. patrick's day parade is a relatively new phenomenon in new york. you had parades by basically catholic churches on st. patrick's day going back to the late 18th century and tended to be a number of small parades by different churches in different parts of town. the first sort of all new york single st. patrick's day parade is 1848, just after you start to see the influx of the irish so it is a firly new tradition, the idea of a single irish march on this date. >> did the parade originate in ireland or in -- >> it is an irish custom as well, but it takes on particular meanings in the american context. joseph. >> is this parade organized by tammanee as well? >> no, it is organized by the ancient order of harburnians, the fraternal group. by the time you get to the 1870s and the wake of the civil war, irish americans were quite convinced they could be legitimately irish and legitimately american
CNBC
May 20, 2012 7:30pm EDT
data in the united states. as well, concerns about jpmorgan. jamie dimon will have to explain himself in front of congress. the senate banking committee is calling on the jpmorgan chase chairman and ceo to testify next month on the company's big trading losses, now valued at possibly as high as $5 billion. the company has lost some $30 billion in market value in a week. >>> it looks like the possibility of additional economic stimulus by the federal reserve could be growing. the fed's open market committee releasing the minutes from the april meeting this week. more members of the fomc now say they are open to additional quantitative easing should the economy falter further. >>> retail sales meanwhile inched up in april. weak clothing and building material sales helping keep that number low. >>> facebook flies, the market tumbles. what happens if greece leaves the euro? a busy week and joining us to help explain what it means, richard bernstein, ceo of richard bernstein advisers. richard, always nice to have you on the program. >> thanks, maria. >> good to see you again. let's talk fa
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 1:30pm EDT
into the united states mostly from southern and eastern europe and mostly to cities on the eastern half of the united states. so the urban machines operating in those cities become almost overrun by these newcomers and don't have enough jobs and don't have enough favors and don't have enough money to do this. it is even harder now because it is harder to get a government job. one of the way that is reformers, critics who don't like the party machines try to under mine them is bypassing civil service laws, laws that require you to meet certain standards or pass a test in order to get a government job, so all of a sudden some of the jobs that used to be at the disposal of particular politicians no longer are. they become the something that you can only get through some kind of exam, some kind of process in which the politicians don't have the say as to who gets the job. my favorite story about this is one from boston in the early 20th century. there was an irish-american politic names james michael curley who would go onto not mayor of the city elected several times, would serve in congre
CNN
May 20, 2012 1:00pm PDT
is at stake for the president of the united states politically? dave, i've downloaded a virus. yeah. ♪ dave, where are we on the new laptop? it's so slow! i'm calling dave. [ telephone rings ] [ male announcer ] in a small business, technology is all you. that's why you've got us. at the staples pc savings event, for a limited time get up to $200 off select computers. staples. that was easy. for a limited time get up to $200 off select computers. every communications provider is different but centurylink is committed to being a different kind of communications company. ♪ we link people and fortune 500 companies nationwide and around the world. and we will continue to free you to do more and focus on what matters. recently, students from 31 countries took part in a science test. the top academic performers surprised some people. so did the country that came in 17th place. let's raise the bar and elevate our academic standards. let's do what's best for our students-by investing in our teachers. let's solve this. i tell you what i can spend. i do my best to make it work. i'm back on the road
WETA
May 20, 2012 9:00am EDT
is that china is four times more people than the united states. that means four times more people to feed, to howls, to take care of. >> i think we have a graphic that shows that. there we are. >> income of per-capita -- income per capita is less than one-tenth of the united states and even by the year 2015 will not catch up anywhere near us. in a really severe totalitarian society like north korea, you could disregard people, star of them and put all of the resources into the military -- >> we have information on the screen derived from the world bank. but this is happening, though. you cannot buy a piece of clothing in the united states that was not made in china, practically. i am sure proud of his jacket, made in haiti. it's sort of looks as though they have taken us over, in a sense, and it creates anxiety and also the great sense that our jobs have gone to china. >> first of all, economists tell us this increase in trade benefits everybody. so, we are getting cheaper jackets than otherwise. but i actually agree that to the degree we are opening ourselves up to china, it must be much
WETA
May 20, 2012 10:00am EDT
in a more aggressive way. >> finally, the fda agreement between colombia and the united states has been signed and ratified. what does that mean for both countries? >> it means a lot of jobs, first of all. yes, jobs. in the case of a colombia, at least 250,000 jobs, new jobs, associated with the development of the free trade agreement. in the u.s., colombian trade and market, we create a lot of new jobs and opportunities for americans. >> you kind of made reference to this earlier in the conversation, that may be in the past there was a stereotype towards colombia which was the drugs and violence and human rights. but now it is education, technology, energy, culture. a vast change in 10 or 12 years. >> we have to recognize the leaders of that change. the president and his team -- part of the team, and as minister of defense -- i was the minister of defense. in those eight years of the two governments, his stamina, leadership, a commitment to evolve from a country that was almost at the brink of failure -- >> yes, yes, yes. >> to a vibrant and peaceful nation is one of the key factors to
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 6:00pm EDT
the aircraft. he flies the airplane 1600 miles across the united states making a stop in st. louis on the way and setting a transcontinental flying record of 21 hours and 40 minutes. and when he gets to new york, there's a very short window of opportunity for him to actually take off. when he hasn't slept, i think, for a night, he's awake the entire time of his flight. he drifts off now and then, but comes back realizing how dangerous it is for him to fall asleep. but it's estimated he was awake for, what, 60 hours bob? 63 hours before he made the flight, so he was very, very tired. i'm sorry, i guess 33 hours on the flight and then 30 hours beforehand. so the whole flight is really about struggling to stay wake. and make no mistake about it, this was a dangerous flight. first of all, by crossing, by taking the route that he took, the polar route, he extended the distance that anyone had ever flown across the atlantic. and there had been others who had flown the atlantic before lindbergh. the distinction here, and it's an important distinction, is that he did it nonstop and solo. so he takes
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 11:30am EDT
century. so the legacy of the civil war and these questions about the united states as a military power, moral questions, legal questions, and military strategy and tactics question is really palpable as an important part of the conversation, i think. >> i don't need to define a legacy at all. i think we just did since i forgot to. i am going to go in the order that these were raised and get us all to weigh in on this. andy, your point about how does one understand how americans find compromise, find a middle ground? you reminded me immediately one of the things robert penn warren wrote about 50 years ago in his little book, legacy of the civil war, was that he believed the civil war gave us pragmatism. pragmatism may be a little older than the civil war, his whole point was that this era of such terrible bloody extremes, horrifying extremes, brought about in america and louie minnon has written about this. brought about in the next generation, a philosophical outlook or temperament we have come to call pragmatism, ala william james and others. is that gone? can that kind of thing truly
NBC
May 20, 2012 11:30am EDT
in the course of this presidential campaign? >> well, i think in many ways what the role of the united states is, how do we operate internationally and how much is the world dependent on us, how do our national interests play into that? and obviously dealing with the terrorist threat is very important, nuclear proliferation, how to make sure that the worst weapons don't get into the hands of the worst people. our economic security obviously plays into that because our strength depends on our strength at home. it's the integration of all of these issues and then basically what you are responsibilities are towards our allies and to those that in many ways are suffering as a result of their desire for freedom. >> and look what we have just this weekend with a g-8 meeting and nato at a time when the euro zone is under tremendous economic strain which could have an impact on our own economy here, the whole issue of economic austerity becoming an issue for our debt problems here in the u.s. so we feel such interrelationship and all the while winding down the conflict in afghanistan and what responsibi
FOX News
May 20, 2012 1:00pm PDT
: after seven years of imprisonment blind activist chen guangcheng is now in the united states. this is brand-new video. he struck a deal with the chinese government to leave his homeland and study law at new york university. his fight for freedom sparking a diplomatic firestorm between china and the u.s. david lee miller more on this. >> it is a beautiful day in new york city especially beautiful for mr. chen, weather is perfect and he was out enjoying it. he was also enjoying something he hasn't seen a great deal of, his freedom. he came down from his apartment part of the housing for students and faculty at the campus. he spent some time in a private playground on the campus. he was using a wheelchair. he injured his right leg but for the most part he seemed to be in good spirits. he stayed 30 yards away from reporters, we were told that she not going to speak to the media and as much as possible he wanted his privacy. we were told not to take pictures of had his children. we arrived yesterday with his wife and two kids in a 13-hour flight from china. he landed at newark air
CNN
May 20, 2012 11:30am PDT
are looking at these live images of the president of the united states along with the nato secretary general, welcoming in many of those leaders, all there in chicago for this nato summit. thanks so much, elise. >>> all right, right now, italy is serving the damage after a strong earthquake shook parts of the country earlier this morning. the u.s. geological survey says the epicenter of the 6.0 quake was just north of bologna. workers are still digging through the rubble, looking for survivors. at least seven people are dead and 50 injured. >>> a chinese activist is enjoying some rest and relaxation with family in new york today, but his journey here was a long and difficult diplomatic process. we'll talk to one of the people who made it possible. ♪ why do you whisper, green grass? ♪ [ all ] shh! ♪ why tell the trees what ain't so? ♪ [ male announcer ] dow solutions use vibration reduction technology to help reduce track noise so trains move quieter through urban areas all over the world. together, the elements of science and the human element can solve anything. [ all ] shh! [ male
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 9:30am EDT
of the government during that extraordinary year 150 years ago. the 37th congress of the united states was arguably the most productive, the most creative, the most farseeing and the most consequenceal in american history. don't take my word for it. here's john nicolai, the grouchy gatekeeper of lincoln's presidential office. the secretary whose job it was to say no on behalf of the busiest man in the world and, boy, was he ever good at it. people called him irascible. that was the only one of the names that i can repeat in -- on c-span. when congress adjourned in mid july after about 7 1/2 months in session, having wrenched american history from the dead end of slavery toward the hard, slow course of freedom, having created our modern monetary and fiscal machinery, having established the -- united states as a world class military and naval power, having opened the frontier to homestead settlers and supported their toil through a bureau -- federal bureau of agriculture, having authorized a rail length from the atlantic to the pacific across the same daunting mountain pass that doomed the donner par
PBS
May 20, 2012 12:30pm PDT
the united states was involved, are reprehensible speech in many ways, but, you know, barack obama ordered the killing of osama bin laden. how is this relevant? >> you used the word "reprehensible," in connection with the idea of running an ad about jeremiah wright. it is not at all off limits. tactically, i guess a mistake, and romney is right not to do it -- it is a mistake, and romney is right not to do it. he doesn't need to. today, obama has a record. you run against his record. he is not a mystery. but the idea that somehow it is off limits or reprehensible as chirac procuracy on the part of the press -- is sheer hypocrisy on the part of the press. >> the reality is that this was not dropped by the press in 2008. it was a central issue which dominated theampaign for close to a week and led to president obama -- then-candidate obama -- giving the most watched the speech of his generation did reverend wright had many shownts, on bill moyers' and many other venues, and john mccain to his credit said that this was something we would not approach. >> there was a steady drumbeat from rush
CNN
May 20, 2012 7:00am PDT
in the united states. >>> this is "gps, the global public square." welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. we have a very important show today dealing with the biggest problems facing the world. as europe is crumbling, the man who is seen as its potential savior is italy's new prime minister mario monti, super mario. i have an exclusive interview with him. monty has been trying to reform italy, reassure markets, and keep the jrmans happy. if he succeeds, ae charts a path out of the crisis for other countries. then iran. it's in dire economic straits for a very different reason. we have another exclusive. if one with iran's finance minister about just how crippling u.s.-led sanctions have been for his nation. next up, a conversation with paul, the biggest question in the world today is whether to spend or whether to cut. krugman is the leading voice saying stimulate. i'll ask him to defend his views. all that plus superstitions in the race for space. but, first, here's my take. everyone is worried that greece might default on its national debt. that
CSPAN
May 19, 2012 11:00pm EDT
dangerous, including full-scale war. and because the united states is allied with japan, with the philippines, and with other countries in the region, there's a strong risk of u.s. involvement in any such clash, and if you have been following developments in washington, you'll know that president obama and secretary of state hillary clinton have said that with the war in iraq and afghanistan over, the center of gravity of american military policy from now on is going to be the south china sea, and it's going to involve u.s. naval power deployed in the area to support the countries that have clashed with china over these disputed territories. so this is becoming the most dangerous, in my view, the most dangerous area in the world, with respect to the possibility of u.s.-china conflict. i also worry that similar clashes will occur in other disputed maritime areas, like the caspian sea and the faulkland islands, and nobody paid much attention since the last war but now that the uk is drilling in the contested area. othe faulklands, tensions with argentina have heeded up aga
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 12:25am EDT
. if they refuse to me in a nice way of them i lost faith in the united states of america. i have always believed before that the people from the justice when they couldn't anywhere else in the world. she then learned about the civil rights conference and begged them to help me. then they gave me courage to keep funding to win. i remember you when i was a girl how interested you were in negro people. please help me now. my people can't stand these police brutality is much longer. please answer. eleanor roosevelt wrote to several people she knew in new jersey and putting the attorney-general, they all assured the supreme court in the appeal would treat this case and a very fair manner and see that justice was done so eleanor roosevelt wrote that back bessie mitchell. the next bit was after the convictions were overturned on all six by the new jersey supreme court is that the speaker is paul robeson. i think some of you may know who he was, a fantastic human being, a huge black guy. he could sing, he could act, he was an athlete who was very active in civil rights and his time. the wealth of the u.
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 12:30pm EDT
with a confederate flag right behind him. literally a flag of treason. running for president of the united states, i couldn't even -- my eyes went like this. i couldn't even -- even knowing who ron paul is, i think it pretty much was him, literally, actually him. he went on tim russet -- this must have been '08 it would have been -- he went on "meet the press" and made the argument that lincoln being a tyrant, it would have ended, anyway. i don't know if anyone has aggressively made that argument. is ron paul even a southerner? he is a southerner. but is he from texas? >> he is from texas. >> he's originally from texas, okay. >> all right. so he's a southerner. there you go. his appeal is certainly much broader than that. it really, really is. i would say if george allen wins the senate race, george allen is another person who is very much identified -- >> that's in virginia. >> -- in virginia. i think he is a southerner. i think he actually grew up somewhere. i think he grew up in california or somewhere. >> his dad was coaching. >> his dad was a football coach moving around. >> right, right, right
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 10:15am EDT
is not going to have the same kind partnership with the united states. it is going to be a rival for the united states when he see ec projections of how the global economy will turn out. many people expect india to overtake the u.s. by the middle of this century. there is an opportunity to build that partnership, and the danger could be that brazil becomes a rival to the united states, which i don't think will be a healthy thing. my suggestion was strategically it makes sense to back up her cell. >> that is a good, strong points. >> there's no reason why they shouldn't be better friends. >> my wife is from there, so there's no problem. [applause] >> one of the problems we talked about was social inclusion. we will next be looking at ethnicity, gender, as well as rights. keep an eye out for that. let's join all of our panelists and thank them for coming up here. especially john. [applause] [applause] he is able to sign books. if you'd like your book signed, i highly recommend it. we will be sticking around. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] cement is there a nonfiction author o
CSPAN
May 19, 2012 9:00pm EDT
shuivists. ratchets up the concern over the possibility that immigrants coming to the united states are bringing dangerous political ideas, that they can overthrow the russian government, they could do it here as well. so you see in the immediate aftermath of world war i, a red scare that intensifies nativism, hostility toward immigrants a little more in this process. and of course, this is something that they lay out for you in the chapter you read, the immigrants fight back. they're fighting back all through the '20s and certainly the fight back, the resistance to these arguments about 100% americanism and no hyphen intensifies as those concepts are asserted. you start to see campaigns buy groups like the ancient order of hiprpians and the german american alliance against immigration restriction. you start to see other, these liberty loan drives in ethnic communities that really assert the idea that you can be ethnic and be a good american simultaneously in all of this. the church speaks out against immigration restriction and some of the other nativest expressions of this period.
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 4:15pm EDT
that survey is seven years of u.s. security policy to argue that the united states has gone terribly awry trying to make itself save. david's basic point is that the institutions we have built and policies we have established to ensure our national security were originally designed to fight not cmac germany and waged a cold war against the soviet union. they weren't conceived to protect us against today's international terrorism and other 21st century threats david argues that since the time of roosevelt and truman, we have slipped into what he calls a permanent self renewing state of emergency. marked by excessive secret agencies and a kind of imperial presidency, and our constitution had never intended that. the results have been an increasingly complicated, costly and ineffectual security system that has damaged our democracy, undermine the our economic strength, and ironically, david argues, left us more vulnerable. david doesn't just describe, he also prescribes. the final part of his book contains a blueprint for the future. as you might imagine from his searing critique, the soluti
NBC
May 20, 2012 6:00am PDT
. washington was skeptical from the claim. >> i think all of us here in the united states were surprised, disappointed and angry about the release. >> back in tripoli, he said i have never harmed anyone in my life. the truth is still hidden. >> some counterterrorism experts admit there were flaws in his trial. >> with his death, the change of the regime in libya, i think is -- although not a fully satisfying one -- the end of the story of terrorism in libyan terrorism. >> but others think the libyan was only a scapegoat. >> with his demise, there is no clearer account of what happened. >> but not the questions. nbc news, london. >>> now we're going to switch gears and talk about the weather and tropical storm alberto churning off the coast of south carolina. chris is upstairs with the latest. >> good morning, jenna. tropical storm alberto is the first storm of the season. in fact, it's just about two weeks early at the beginning of hurricane season. cannot read too much into that as the predictor or the rest of the season, but it just takes once for it to be a bad season. one could be a
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